Lazar, Lazarus, Lazaret, Lazarette vs. Lazaretto (A “Lazy” Comparison)

Whether you’re a poet looking for words that start with L or a student trying to understand what a lazarette is, I have made this list to assist you. So now let’s begin.

LAZAR

define lazar a diseased person

A lazar is a diseased person, especially a poor person with a feared disease such as leprosy.

LAZARUS

lazarus compared to lazar

According to the online Merriem-Webster dictionary, Lazarus was: “… a brother of Mary and Martha raised by Jesus from the dead according to the account in John 11. 2 : the diseased beggar in the parable of the rich man and the beggar found in Luke 16.”

LAZARETTE

lazarette vs lazaret

On a sailing vessel, a lazarette is a storage compartment near the stern, typically accessed by a trapdoor on the deck. A lazarette could be used to store many things but it is interesting to note that a lazarette was and could be used as quarantine space if diseased members were on the ship.

LAZARETTO

what is a lazaretto

Throughout history, especially during times of plague, isolation hospitals known as lazarettos were erected, and in times of emergency, buildings and even moored boats were quarantined to act as temporary hospitals. A lazaretto is an isolation hospital or barricaded place to house diseased people (sometimes called a lazar house). Even a market square, for example, could be barricaded to act as a lazaretto and hence be called a lazaretto. Modern hospitals have hundreds of functions, but a lazaretto’s function is purely to hold and sometimes treat diseased people, especially people with a feared and contagious disease.

LAZARET

lazaret vs lazaretto

It’s important to note that the word lazaret is interchangeable with lazarette and lazaretto, though lazaret is most commonly used to mean lazaretto. Here is lazaret’s threefold definition:

  1. A lazar house; an isolated hospital for people with infectious diseases.
  2. A building, boat or barricaded area used for quarantine.
  3. On a sailing vessel, a storage compartment near the stern, typically accessed by a trapdoor on the deck.

I hope this comparison aids you in your studies! Stay healthy 🙂

Vintenar vs Vintner vs Verderer

VINTENAR

define vintenar

Vintenar means, in medieval England, a leader of a score of footmen, more specifically a leader of twenty draft men. During wars or anarchies, freemen such as farmers were paid to become infantry soldiers in order to help quell a tumult, defend a fortification or join a greater army and march to battle. Whatever the cause, a vintenar was responsible for leading his twenty infantry to victory. Whether the leader hired the footmen himself or was charged with them doesn’t matter, so long as he leads them he earns the title vintenar.

VINTNER

define vintner

A winemaker or a wine merchant can both be called vintners. A wine connoisseur, a grape farmer or a sot, however, cannot claim the title of vintner, sadly. Only those who make or sell wine can claim such a sexy title.

VERDERER

define verderer

Someone has to make sure no one shoots the king’s deer. That’s one of a verderer’s many responsibilities as a verderer is a judicial officer of a royal forest. Footpads stalk the swamps waylaying and accosting drovers and peddlers, but the local verderer is hiring men to deal with the quandary. Hungry peasants may mock a verderer behind his back, hate him, because being unable to use the king’s coppices and hunt the king’s precious boars can mean a night without dinner. So if you’re breaking the law–hunting in the king’s forest–watch your back because the verderer in these parts is a stern man who likes to take the law into his own hands.

Springalds versus Ballistae – What is the Mechanical Difference?

This is not a historical lesson with dates and events, but a mechanical lesson to explain the physical differences between these two magnificent ancient artillery weapons.

Springalds and ballistae are both “catapults” that loose either spear-like bolts, Greek fire or round stones. The major difference between them is in how they hold the power necessary to launch these projectiles. I would like to start by clarifying the definition of the word “catapult” because many people confound that word with “mangonel.” A catapult is any stationary device that uses built-up tension to fire or, in more accurate terms, loose or shoot a projectile. Like ballistae and springalds, a mangonel is a certain kind of catapult. So do not picture a mangonel every time you hear the word catapult like I did for many years 🙂

Springalds (also known as espringals)

ballista compared with espringal

how do springalds operate

Like many arbalests or heavy crossbows, springalds use devices known windlasses to build-up tension in skeins, bow arms and draw cords. However, springalds have inward-facing bow arms and ballistae have outward-facing bow arms. A springald, at first glance, may look odd because they are not as common in movies and video games as ballistae are. Some springalds look very similar to ballistae (their only difference being in which direction the bow arms face) but other springalds, like the example below, look like bizarre wooden cages.

the difference between a ballista and a springald or espringal

Whatever the design, a springald can always be differentiated from a ballista by gandering at the bow arms. Ballistae have outward-facing bow arms that are always facing outwards even when they are not bearing tension; they simply look like over-sized crossbows on mounts. Springalds, on the other hand, when they are not bearing tension, have smaller arms that face forwards and they do not face inwards until accumulated tension bends them towards the operator using the cranequin. It is easy to see how these rectangular springalds on wheels would be better for besieging whereas the mounted ones that look like ballistae would be better for defending because they could be permanently installed atop turrets and bastions.

Ballistae

ballista vs springald

We’ve already done a sufficient comparison for there is not much difference between these two famed weapons of ancient war, but it may be good to cap off what we’ve learned by briefly comparing a ballista to an arbalest. An arbalest is either a cranequin crossbow or a windlass crossbow. Below I will show a picture of a cranequin crossbow so you can see just how similar it is to a ballista and also how different it is from a springald.

similarities between crossbows and ballistae and springalds

See how the bow arms of the crossbow and ballista face outwards while the springald has bow arms that face forwards until tension brings them inwards? If you see the difference, you now know what separates a springald from a ballista! Yay! Now let’s do a little test: what type of catapult is the bolt thrower in the scene of the Greek siege at the top of this article? Is it a springald or a ballista?

GUAR versus GAUR

The other day I added guar to my Book of Words. Then I thought, wait … am I getting guar mixed up with gaur? It’s like that time I got auger mixed up with augur. That was a few days ago, and now this is my attempt to never get guar mixed up with gaur again!

GUAR

Popular for its seeds (peas) which can be reformed into a gum known as “guar gum” (oft used in processed foods as a binder or thickener) a guar is a drought-resistant plant of the pea family, native to the dry climes of Africa and Asia. The word guar can refer to a single plant, or it can be used as a plural noun to refer to the seeds. An example: “From one guar I got a whole bowl of guar.” Indeed, guar can also refer to the various refined forms, such as guar flower or guar gum. So next time someone tells you the soccer ball is off behind the guar somewhere, hopefully you’ll remember this boring blog post you read.

guar-vs-gaur

GAUR

Native to Malaysia and India, a gaur (pronounced gower) is a bulky wild ox. Like the word bison (which is an ox native to North America and Europe), gaur can be used as a singular noun or as a plural, albeit saying gaurs to mean plural is also acceptable. So next time you’re in India and you see a wild ox, you’ll know what to call it. But for the almighty’s sake, you better not get it mixed up with guar!

the-difference-between-guar-and-gaur

A List of Synonyms for “Horse” with their Unique Definitions

  1. Palfrey – a compliable horse for casual riding, especially by women.
  2. Mule, hinny – the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse, usually sterile and used as a beast of burden.
  3. Dray horse, draft horse, cart horse, sled horse – a burly and formidable horse for pulling drays, carts, buggies, sleds, etc.
  4. Rounsey, rouncey – an all-purpose horse, able to be trained for war if needed.
  5. Courser – a swift or spirited horse, in any application.
  6. Destrier – a medieval knight’s horse for battles or tourneys.
  7. Warhorse – a big, mighty horse trained for war, whether it be modern or historical.
  8. Mount, steed – a horse being ridden or is available for riding.
  9. Remount – a fresh horse to replace one that is no longer usable.
  10. Charger – a swift warhorse or cavalry horse.
  11. Cob – a brawny, short-legged horse, typically for riding.
  12. Pony, hobby – a small stocky horse, especially one of several specific breeds, like the Pottok for example.
  13. Nag, plug, rocinante – a horse that is old or in poor health.
  14. Colt – an uncastrated male horse under four years of age.
  15. Stallion, stud – any uncastrated male horse.
  16. Gelding – a castrated male horse.
  17. Mare – a female horse, especially one available for breeding.
  18. Bronco – a wild or half-tamed horse.
  19. Stepper – a horse with a quick, beautiful gait, such as a trained marching horse.
  20. Filly – a female horse under four years of age.
  21. Foal – any young or baby horse.
  22. Yearling – any horse that is only one or two years old.
  23. Garron – a sturdy horse for working, typically small.
  24. Mustang – a wild horse.
  25. Suckling – an unweaned horse.
  26. Weanling – a newly weaned horse.
  27. Equine – any animal of the horse family, such as a donkey.
  28. Workhorse – could be any hired or draft horse, but typically refers to a farm horse.
  29. Racehorse – a horse raised for professional racing.
  30. Packhorse – a horse with panniers, or any horse that is not ridden but used to carry loads, usually led in a line or tied behind the riding horse.
  31. Sumpter – any animal used as a beast of burden, including horses.
  32. Hackney – a horse with a high-stepping trot, typically a trained riding horse or carriage horse.
  33. Padnag, pad, ambler – a horse that moves along at an ambling pace.
  34. Grey, gray – any white or gray horse. For example, “Jon saddled the gray then spurred off.”
  35. Sorrel – a horse with a brownish-red coat–a sorrel coat.
  36. Caballine – an adjective meaning: of or related to a horses or horses.

I use this list as a helpful reference during writing and research. I will be updating it whenever I feel the need, so please let me know if I missed synonyms or think something should be changed or improved. Thanks!

mêlée

Vermiform and Silver Lining: Eveland’s Word and Wisdom of the Week

Due to my hectic schedule, I’ve decided to change my ‘Word of the Night’ service into a ‘Word and Wisdom of the Week’ service. Building a vocabulary goes hand in hand with collecting worldly wisdom, so I’m sure this service will benefit anyone who’s willing to follow.

WORD

This week’s word is vermiform. Vermiform is an adjective which means ‘having the semblance of a worm.’ For example, the vermiform sea monster wriggled onto shore.

WISDOM

This week’s wisdom is a gentle reminder to always see the silver lining. Some people always look for faults in things, commenting on what’s ugly and wrong. These tend to be the least happy of people. Others who train their minds to observe the good in things are more prone to smile when something goes amiss.

A few years ago, during what my friends would call my spiritual phase, I got really good at seeing the silver lining. I’ve since gone back to my old ways, and now I have to train myself all over again. I believe learning to see the good, even when the bad seems too burdensome, can not only improve your mental mood but increase your overall health as well.

Happy daydreaming.

P.S. If you’re a lover of blogs, my friend has started up a great news/motivational blog called The Canadian Spire. Check it out 🙂 http://thecanadianspire.com

 

Estoc: Sir Eveland’s Word of the Night – Dec 24th, 2016

An estoc, used from the 14th to the 17th century, is an edgeless two-handed sword designed specifically for fighting against opponents who are wearing full suits of steel armour. Similar to a rondel dagger, the estoc is meant for finding its way into the niches of armor (armpits, neck, visor, the back of the knee, etc). Being edgeless also means that its wielder can use it like a mace more easily, indeed reverse it so use it like a polehammer.