The Perfect Day

I didn’t know or care what a perfect day was until I unintentionally experienced one. It was a day off. Like most days away from my fake job, I rose from bed to do my real job. I made coffee and picked up a book.

I read some of Bernard Cornwell’s Harlequin, specifically the last battle at Crécy. I love how Bernard somehow teaches history through light reading. During lunch, I watched my favorite YouTuber’s daily video. It was coincidentally a historical evaluation of the Battle of Crécy. How strange?

After lunch, I began writing to reach my daily word count. I wrote about a battle between a hairy monster and a serried shield wall. It was the first time I had shaped such a scene. The monster’s long arms crashed against the shields like poleaxes. After sliding my keyboard away for the day, I made dinner and watched a few more historical YouTube videos.

As the sun was lowering behind the horizon, I put my keyboard back in place to play some video games. In other words, I strapped on my shield, flourished my blade and ran into battle. It was bloody chaos. But I ruled the night and slaughtered my enemies. After many long battles, I unstrapped my shield and pushed my keyboard away.

It had been a long day. I capped it off by watching a documentary in bed. It was a doc’ about the Norman conquest. Seeing a theme yet? When the flick ended, I closed my eyes and realized what I had done. It was beautiful.

The perfect day.

GUAR versus GAUR

The other day I added guar to my Book of Words. Then I thought, wait … am I getting guar mixed up with gaur? It’s like that time I got auger mixed up with augur. That was a few days ago, and now this is my attempt to never get guar mixed up with gaur again!

GUAR

Popular for its seeds (peas) which can be reformed into a gum known as “guar gum” (oft used in processed foods as a binder or thickener) a guar is a drought-resistant plant of the pea family, native to the dry climes of Africa and Asia. The word guar can refer to a single plant, or it can be used as a plural noun to refer to the seeds. An example: “From one guar I got a whole bowl of guar.” Indeed, guar can also refer to the various refined forms, such as guar flower or guar gum. So next time someone tells you the soccer ball is off behind the guar somewhere, hopefully you’ll remember this boring blog post you read.

guar-vs-gaur

GAUR

Native to Malaysia and India, a gaur (pronounced gower) is a bulky wild ox. Like the word bison (which is an ox native to North America and Europe), gaur can be used as a singular noun or as a plural, albeit saying gaurs to mean plural is also acceptable. So next time you’re in India and you see a wild ox, you’ll know what to call it. But for the almighty’s sake, you better not get it mixed up with guar!

the-difference-between-guar-and-gaur

Thinking of becoming nocturnal? Here are a few pros and cons plus some things to consider.

As an introvert author in Victoria BC Canada, being nocturnal was GRAND at first. There’s a 24/7 grocery store a twenty-minute walk from my abode. My smile was huge when I strutted down the busiest road in my neighborhood one faithful night. There was not a single person to be seen. It may be because I like to think more than I speak but damn was it ever nice not to have loud cars zipping around chaotically as I performed my thang down the serene sidewalk, thinking too much for my own good.

If you consider walking a form of meditation, then you probably already know how great walking at night can be. My city doesn’t have what you could call a prominent nightlife, especially on Tuesdays. When it comes to nighttime traffic, obviously Downtown Victoria, Esquimalt and James Bay are different stories compared to Gorden Head and Oak Bay. That’s exactly why being nocturnal could be interesting for an extrovert as well. No matter which jungle or forest you live in, there should always be something to do. But if your forest is full of crickets, wanting someone to talk to can drag you back into daytime life. And that’s when we stop talking about things that can be interesting.

Notice how I said at first in the very first sentence of this mediocre blog post.

I did that because I was a noobie to the nocturnal life about six months ago and now it’s catching up quick, Billy Boy. If you want to be nocturnal, you have to BE nocturnal or else you’ll become one of those sleepy, grumpy people (hopefully not, this was a joke with a hint of truth is all). During my half-year experimentation extravaganza, I fell into all sorts of slips and cycles of sleep and the drear no sleep at all.

My favorite part was when I WAS nocturnal. I hadn’t seen the sun in weeks. That’s how it’s supposed to be.

That was at first. Ah, it was wonderful. I was writing the ending to Knights of the Dawn on Halloween night. That whole week I had gained a ritual of a routine. I would stir out of bed to become the raccoon the neighbors hear in their sleep. With Lord Spywater and his epic last stand against Lord Highcross spiraling through my head, I took long walks in a pitch-black soccer field. The air was so dark all around me that I could open my eyes and envision everything I was to write happening live before my eyes like virtual reality. I pictured the mist skirting the destriers’ hocks as the knights led the wains of death down the road. I looked to the midnight firmament and descried Lord Spywater’s raven swooping down from a bright blue dawn. That bloody book Knights of the Dawn would not have been the same if I hadn’t taken those eldritch midnight walks, I tell ya.

At first it was wonderful. Now as I write this I’ve been up for more than twenty-four hours and I don’t know why I’m writing this. I’m hungry but I’m too tired and lazy to go to the store, plus I don’t want to deal with all those noisy, chaotic cars. Take from this what you will. I’m going to bed.

 

A List of Synonyms for “Horse” with their Unique Definitions

  1. Palfrey – a compliable horse for casual riding, especially by women.
  2. Mule, hinny – the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse, usually sterile and used as a beast of burden.
  3. Dray horse, draft horse, cart horse, sled horse – a burly and formidable horse for pulling drays, carts, buggies, sleds, etc.
  4. Rounsey, rouncey – an all-purpose horse, able to be trained for war if needed.
  5. Courser – a swift or spirited horse, in any application.
  6. Destrier – a medieval knight’s horse for battles or tourneys.
  7. Warhorse – a big, mighty horse trained for war, whether it be modern or historical.
  8. Mount, steed – a horse being ridden or is available for riding.
  9. Remount – a fresh horse to replace one that is no longer usable.
  10. Charger – a swift warhorse or cavalry horse.
  11. Cob – a brawny, short-legged horse, typically for riding.
  12. Pony, hobby – a small stocky horse, especially one of several specific breeds, like the Pottok for example.
  13. Nag, plug, rocinante – a horse that is old or in poor health.
  14. Colt – an uncastrated male horse under four years of age.
  15. Stallion, stud – any uncastrated male horse.
  16. Gelding – a castrated male horse.
  17. Mare – a female horse, especially one available for breeding.
  18. Bronco – a wild or half-tamed horse.
  19. Stepper – a horse with a quick, beautiful gait, such as a trained marching horse.
  20. Filly – a female horse under four years of age.
  21. Foal – any young or baby horse.
  22. Yearling – any horse that is only one or two years old.
  23. Garron – a sturdy horse for working, typically small.
  24. Mustang – a wild horse.
  25. Suckling – an unweaned horse.
  26. Weanling – a newly weaned horse.
  27. Equine – any animal of the horse family, such as a donkey.
  28. Workhorse – could be any hired or draft horse, but typically refers to a farm horse.
  29. Racehorse – a horse raised for professional racing.
  30. Packhorse – a horse with panniers, or any horse that is not ridden but used to carry loads, usually led in a line or tied behind the riding horse.
  31. Sumpter – any animal used as a beast of burden, including horses.
  32. Hackney – a horse with a high-stepping trot, typically a trained riding horse or carriage horse.
  33. Padnag, pad, ambler – a horse that moves along at an ambling pace.
  34. Grey, gray – any white or gray horse. For example, “Jon saddled the gray then spurred off.”
  35. Sorrel – a horse with a brownish-red coat–a sorrel coat.
  36. Caballine – an adjective meaning: of or related to a horses or horses.

I use this list as a helpful reference during writing and research. I will be updating it whenever I feel the need, so please let me know if I missed synonyms or think something should be changed or improved. Thanks!

mêlée

Vermiform and Silver Lining: Eveland’s Word and Wisdom of the Week

Due to my hectic schedule, I’ve decided to change my ‘Word of the Night’ service into a ‘Word and Wisdom of the Week’ service. Building a vocabulary goes hand in hand with collecting worldly wisdom, so I’m sure this service will benefit anyone who’s willing to follow.

WORD

This week’s word is vermiform. Vermiform is an adjective which means ‘having the semblance of a worm.’ For example, the vermiform sea monster wriggled onto shore.

WISDOM

This week’s wisdom is a gentle reminder to always see the silver lining. Some people always look for faults in things, commenting on what’s ugly and wrong. These tend to be the least happy of people. Others who train their minds to observe the good in things are more prone to smile when something goes amiss.

A few years ago, during what my friends would call my spiritual phase, I got really good at seeing the silver lining. I’ve since gone back to my old ways, and now I have to train myself all over again. I believe learning to see the good, even when the bad seems too burdensome, can not only improve your mental mood but increase your overall health as well.

Happy daydreaming.

P.S. If you’re a lover of blogs, my friend has started up a great news/motivational blog called The Canadian Spire. Check it out 🙂 http://thecanadianspire.com

 

Estoc: Sir Eveland’s Word of the Night – Dec 24th, 2016

An estoc, used from the 14th to the 17th century, is an edgeless two-handed sword designed specifically for fighting against opponents who are wearing full suits of steel armour. Similar to a rondel dagger, the estoc is meant for finding its way into the niches of armor (armpits, neck, visor, the back of the knee, etc). Being edgeless also means that its wielder can use it like a mace more easily, indeed reverse it so use it like a polehammer.

Fauld vs Tonlet: Sir Eveland’s Word of the Night

Faulds and tonlets are both pieces of armor worn below the breastplate to protect the groin and waist, but some major differences separate them.

FAULD + TASSETS

fauld-armor-for-the-waist

Worn over a skirt of maille, a fauld is a piece of armor attached to the bottom of a breastplate, corresponding to a ‘culet’ which hangs from the bottom of a backplate on the other side (though in early to mid medieval times, culets were rarely worn as maille over the arse was deemed ‘good enough’). A fauld consists of steel lames connected by strips of leather, albeit other less popular methods were sometimes used to connect them. The leather strips allow expansion and contraction, which is absolutely necessary because the fauld needs to contract when the wearer mounts a horse. Oftimes, additional ‘tassets’ were hinged to the bottom of faulds to hang over the ‘cuisses’ and provide additional protection for thighs. In later medieval times, tassets grew to ridiculous lengths, stretching past the knees.

TONLET

what-is-a-tonlet-for

A tonlet is very similar to a fauld, but it’s more difficult to be comfortable on a horse while wearing one. You may need a hand mounting. This is because tonlets are thrice as long and don’t have as much flexibility, though by looking at many images, you can see how they would be able to contract somewhat, making jousting possible. Their purpose is to be rigid, supplying great if not desirable protection against lances or, depending on the century, lead balls. There’s no use attaching tassets to a tonlet because they already reach down close to the knees, depending on the particular size as many were built specially. Tonlets wrap around the entire waist like a skirt, so there’s also no need for a culet. They supply much more protection than faulds, as you can imagine, perfect against the deadlier weapons of the time, like crow’s beaks. Occasionally you would see tonlets on the battlefield, by men who wanted to keep their arses safe.

Faulds, on the other hand, were meant for open battle, meant to allow near-perfect maneuverability for the common knecht. With all that said, I’d much rather wear a tonlet behind a bulwark; thank you very much.