The Perfect Day

I didn’t know or care what a perfect day was until I unintentionally experienced one. It was a day off. Like most days away from my fake job, I rose from bed to do my real job. I made coffee and picked up a book.

I read some of Bernard Cornwell’s Harlequin, specifically the last battle at Crécy. I love how Bernard somehow teaches history through light reading. During lunch, I watched my favorite YouTuber’s daily video. It was coincidentally a historical evaluation of the Battle of Crécy. How strange?

After lunch, I began writing to reach my daily word count. I wrote about a battle between a hairy monster and a serried shield wall. It was the first time I had shaped such a scene. The monster’s long arms crashed against the shields like poleaxes. After sliding my keyboard away for the day, I made dinner and watched a few more historical YouTube videos.

As the sun was lowering behind the horizon, I put my keyboard back in place to play some video games. In other words, I strapped on my shield, flourished my blade and ran into battle. It was bloody chaos. But I ruled the night and slaughtered my enemies. After many long battles, I unstrapped my shield and pushed my keyboard away.

It had been a long day. I capped it off by watching a documentary in bed. It was a doc’ about the Norman conquest. Seeing a theme yet? When the flick ended, I closed my eyes and realized what I had done. It was beautiful.

The perfect day.

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GUAR versus GAUR

The other day I added guar to my Book of Words. Then I thought, wait … am I getting guar mixed up with gaur? It’s like that time I got auger mixed up with augur. That was a few days ago, and now this is my attempt to never get guar mixed up with gaur again!

GUAR

Popular for its seeds (peas) which can be reformed into a gum known as “guar gum” (oft used in processed foods as a binder or thickener) a guar is a drought-resistant plant of the pea family, native to the dry climes of Africa and Asia. The word guar can refer to a single plant, or it can be used as a plural noun to refer to the seeds. An example: “From one guar I got a whole bowl of guar.” Indeed, guar can also refer to the various refined forms, such as guar flower or guar gum. So next time someone tells you the soccer ball is off behind the guar somewhere, hopefully you’ll remember this boring blog post you read.

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GAUR

Native to Malaysia and India, a gaur (pronounced gower) is a bulky wild ox. Like the word bison (which is an ox native to North America and Europe), gaur can be used as a singular noun or as a plural, albeit saying gaurs to mean plural is also acceptable. So next time you’re in India and you see a wild ox, you’ll know what to call it. But for the almighty’s sake, you better not get it mixed up with guar!

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